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123 OEA Podcast - Optimize your time for greater profits

What’s up Empire!

Joshua Woodward here,

One of your largest assets in life is your time. As entrepreneurs we need to maximize our time to the best of our ability. Today we have Tim Nash on to talk us through concurring your work load and developing good boundaries around your time. Tim is an expert in this field. He is a consultant and coach for business professionals all over the world. A while ago he had written an article about the strategic approach to setting clear boundaries and managing your work load. I dont know about you but this is an area I have definitely need some help in.

If you want to go check out Tim's Blog post go to, http://thepathtopeakperformance.com/4-step-approach-to-set-boundaries-manage-your-workload-now/

To get more involved with what we are doing go to, http://www.theonlineempireacademy.com

For those of you wanting more information about our podcast sponsor follow the directions below,
Step #1. Go to Amazon.com
Step #2 Type in “address labels” into the search bar
Step #3 Click on “perfect peel address labels”
Step #4 Purchase “perfect peel address labels” with the online empire exclusive promo code given at the end of the podcast.

Until next time Empire,

Have a great day!

—Transcripts Below This Point—

Speaker 1:
Now get ready for the Online Empire Academy Podcast.

Joshua:
What’s up Online Empire Academy? Joshua Woodward here, your podcast host. Today’s sponsor is the Yorba Label Company. They’re giving us 25% off of 3,000 address labels. If you’ve ever shipped Amazon FBA, you know that you need those address labels. It’s a great deal, guys. Here’s how you get it. Go on to Amazon.com, type in “address labels”, select “Perfect Peel Address Labels”. In the checkout, you’re going to use the promo code labels25. That’s going to get you the 25% discount. It’s time to hop in with our guest. Thank you so much for tuning in, and enjoy the podcast.

Today, I have on a very special guest. It's my uncle, but more than anything, Tim Nash is a coach, and has been coaching for a really, really long time. He's been coaching professionals all over the world, and he actually lives in Munich. We are talking to him from Munich live today. I'm super excited. Tim, I wanted to ask you your story. I wanted to introduce you, and I wanted you to just tell people what you've been up to and your back story on how you got there.

Tim:
Sure. Well, first of all, thanks for having me, Josh. Yeah. Well, like you said, I'm in Munich now. I'm originally from Los Angeles, but probably for about the last 21 years or so, I've been, for the most part, living outside of the states. My story is not a traditional one. It's taken a few twist and turns. After 3 years of working in the financial services industry in the Los Angeles area, I decided to do something completely different. I'm talking you back a long time ago, probably a few years after you were born, probably.

Tim:
A couple of years after you were born. I decided to ... I have never been out of the country. I was 23 years old. I've been working at a bank, and I was working at mutual funds house. I was 23, but I felt like I was going on 63, and wanted to do something different. I got a passport. I sold or I gave everything away that I owned, and I went over to far east Asia to teach English. Didn't know anything about teaching or South Korea, but there was an opportunity, they were looking for English teachers, so I went and did that sort of on a whim. While I was there, I had a chance to visit Japan, fell in love with Japan and that area of the world, and ended up staying there for over 3 years, teaching and traveling around Japan and Southeast Asia.

More than anything, I found that I love working with people and with groups. I've been working faceless money, and banks, and trading stocks, and bonds, and things. All of a sudden, I couldn't believe I was getting paid to talk to people and to build relationships. I was teaching for all different purposes, from helping college kids prepare for their entrance exams, their English entrance exams, or helping business, salary men, raise their cultural awareness. It was a natural fit for me. I had studied business in college, so I had a bit of business background and then with the banking work. I felt really like I had found my place, helping people but also with the business context. That led to a few other things and a few more long trips and travels.

Into the '90s, I decided to relocate to the US, or I thought I was ready to relocate. I took a job with the tour company, actually leading international tours all over the world, China, Europe, Alaska. It was like a dream job, or I thought it was a dream job, combining my passion for travel with a profession, leading the tours and again working with people and groups, but soon it became a bit more like replacing passports and a lot of hand holding and things. It wasn't quite the dream job that I had wished for. I went back to the states in San Francisco, that's where I met a young woman by the name of Miriam, who you know is my wife now.

At the time, she was living in San Francisco, and we met. After we dated for a little while, she said, "I got to go back to my home, Munich. It was nice spending some time with you, but I've got to go back." I said, "Well, look, I've been to that area of the world, how about I come with you?" 14 and a half years later, here I am in Munich. Again, it was a great fit when I came here, because I had the background in the financial services industry and the business studies, but then I had also taught English in Asia, so I had a bit of a background with the teaching, but also in the business, the corporate world. This was 2001, 2002. English was really emerging as the global language, and globalization was in full force you could say.

It was great because I jumped into the companies and started teaching business English and intercultural awareness training and competence training. That soon led to management skills training, and so I went from just working with individuals and groups in the classrooms to working with teams and leaders eventually. That led me to doing more of the coaching for professionals for performance but also executive coaching where I really help people raise their awareness and achieve their goals. Usually, it's also working with teams and helping teams to resolve conflicts or to do something and improve performance and their results. That brings us up to the present day in Munich and working with teams and leaders, helping awareness and develop schools or let's say take action for positive change.

Joshua:
I grew up just looking at all this. We get postcards. We'd get calls from all these different places. I grew up with Tim being this epic traveler. We had lived in Georgia when I was younger, and he came back to visit with this long luscious hair. My picture of just the world was so broaden and so exciting for me when he come back and tell all these stories. When watching the transition in my parents going out to visit them in Munich and always desiring just to go and travel more, it's so interesting because the more and more people I talk to, there's this heart of, "Oh, I want to travel. I want to go. I want to do."

I always thought it was inspiring that you just did it. You sold everything, just did it. That was always an inspiration. There was one thing that you said in that, and that was cultural awareness. What is one of the biggest problems you're seeing with young entrepreneurs or young business men that are trying to get into a global market? What's that one problem you're seeing.

Tim:
Okay. I think it's probably a lack of knowledge or awareness about the regions they're trying to break into. I've done a lot of work with mixed German and American teams, for example, project teams and other sort of teams. Although Americans and Germans are very similar, we look alike, however when you're developing product in one country, in Germany, the local market different needs and different issues. You need to be aware of the local markets, if you want to break into ... A lot of companies now are moving to China and Asia. Well, you got to know, what do they want? What are their pain points? How can I help them? Really, I think the biggest problem and issue I just the lack of knowledge with the areas that people want to move into.

Joshua:
That's interesting, because a lot of what we do and a lot of the people we're talking to are private labeling, so they're using sites like Alibaba and going directly from the manufacturers in China, and having those items shipped over. There's a lot of communication with the Chinese marketplace. Just a quick suggestion for that are, what would you give to us as desiring to break into that market? What would you have us know about that specific area or region?

Tim:
Well, here's a big observation that I've made the last few years. The traditional advice was learn the dos and the don'ts before you go to a country. Those are great. It's great to have the dos and the don'ts, then you get the travel guide, or you talk to somebody who's been to those countries, and you learn about what to do, what not to do. However, it's hard to do that these days, because of globalization, and because we all share media, we all share entertainment. When you think, okay, let's say Asia is very hierarchical, you need to go through certain channels to make decisions and things, it might not be the cast.

my best advice would be to let's say a contact person or a partner, a sparring partner from that area, and ask them questions, what do the people need, what do they want, or ask the people directly, the manufacturers or whoever. The more contact you can have, the more you can learn about the people you want to sell to or market to, the better. Each person ... Even China has a lot of regional differences I would imagine. What's good for this area might not be good for another area. Try to figure out what these people need, what are their pain points, how can I help them.

Joshua:
That's really good. The reason I wanted to have Tim on is he runs a blog called The Path to Peak Performance. I was reading it one day, and I came across this article talking about the strategic approach to setting clear boundaries and managing your workload. It was a bit of a mouthful at first, and I started thinking about all the different things that I'm doing on a daily basis and the realization that I'm not optimizing my time. Then it started talking to the people around me and having conversations with dean or just the people we work with on a daily basis. I was like, "Wow. We as solo or entrepreneurs are having these problems with managing time.

I was talking with a friend of mine the other day, and he was like, "Hey. Yeah. The most heartbreaking thing is when you're daughter walks up to you and she's like, 'Daddy, can you please shut your computer. Can we play now?'" I'm like, "Oh my gosh. It's a killer." There is the thing of learning when to stop. My question to you is obviously ... We'll be posting a link to this blog, because I think it's going to be really good for you guys to read this. My question is, what is the problem that you're seeing that brought you to this point of writing the blog post?

Tim:
This article, well, Josh, this is something I see with lots of different professionals that I work with, this having too much on their plate. They're stretched in so many different directions. You talk about solopreneurs or people who are out on their own working. This is maybe even more extreme, and I include myself in that group. We take on more, because we don't have a boss saying, "Okay. This is what you need to do this month, or this year, or whatever." We set our own targets and we push ourselves. Yeah, that computer seems to be on 24/7.

What I saw, what I saw and I still see more than over, inboxes are overflowing. The mails are coming and they're not stopping. Resources are less and less. Whether, again, you're alone or you're working for a team or a group, people are asked to do more with less. Competition is increasing. Of course your profit margins are shrinking, so you've got to be more productive and more effective. Outsourcing is another big issue that I see a lot, because even groups that even 5, 2, 3, years ago would not have been outsourced now are being outsourced. In this whole digitalization, for example, it's turning all kinds of things upside down.

There's this and then balancing this with ... We all have personal commitments, our family and our friends. Then there's the professional commitment, so what we're talking about, responsibilities, and the goals we want to achieve, and the blogs we want to write, and the interviews we want to do. You add to that, add to the personal professional commitments, add to this notion of society now that says, "Busy is important, and stress equals hard work." There's this pressure from the society, and we buy into that, me more than anyone. It's like, "Okay. I've got to make the most of my 8 hours a day here, or my 10 hours."

When my wife is away for the weekend, sometimes times I work the whole weekend. Nobody is saying, "Hey, let's go for a walk. Let's go enjoy the weekend. Let's hear the birds singing in the park. I'm like, "Oh look, I've got this 48 hours I'm going to be alone. I'm going to write 3 blog posts, and I'm going to do this." It goes for all of us.

Joshua:
I think the interesting thing is obviously the more and more you talk to people, the more and more you recognize that we all have our own issues, and we all have our own problems. Mine is I think I'm totally the same way whereas on Monday nights, every Monday nights, Hanna goes and dance. She got this dance class. Every Monday night I go, "Okay. Perfect. It's my time to get that work done." I'm like, "Do I need to rest? Absolutely, but do I need to do this as well? Yeah, absolutely." I've got to maintain what's going on here, but it's not productive. I end up being counterproductive. In the blog post you talked about looking at the bigger picture. What does that mean?

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Tim:
Well, if you think about a professional in a company, obviously there are times when you're really busy. There's a lot on your plate, and you're being stretched in different directions. By looking at the big picture, what I mean is look at the reasons why you're super busy that time. If you're in a company, is there a merger going on? Has your group just been merged with another group? Let's take me for example, I remember when is started my blog a year and a half ago or so, I didn't want a blank blog up there, so I wanted to write a couple of articles a month, so that when people went to my blog, they didn't just see one article there.

Look at the big picture. Why am I busy? Is it permanent? Is it a systemic thing? Do I see an end in sight? If you see it's a temporary situation, then ask yourself. Is this discomfort that I can live with? Tell yourself, " This is not going to last forever." Look at I guess your priorities and the reasons, If you want to be doing something, if you chose to do something on Monday night, I think that's fine as long as you know what you're giving up by working, being aware of the choices you're making and the costs. I think because it's so busy and because we're all moving around and change is all around us, we lose sight of our priorities, and why we do what we do, and if it's worth it or not, the cost.

Joshua:
I wrote in my notes, "Why am I busy?" I think that it's so interesting to look at that perspective and look at the "Why am I busy?" thought process. Why am I doing what I'm doing? Why am I going through what I'm doing? Why am I ... I think just the why questions is so important to this. One of the things that I hate doing is asking for help, but in understand that it's really important. What would you say to somebody in my place that doesn't necessarily wants to do the "I can do it on my own"? What would you say to that?

Tim:
Well, I think that's a natural tendency to want to do things on your own. If I think about ... My article is called, "Take a strategic approach to setting boundaries and saying no and managing the word load." If I think about being strategic, asking for help can actually be strategic. Because by asking for help, let's say you're asking your boss or even your colleagues for help, you're communicating that, your big picture, to them. You can kill 2 birds with 1 stone even. There's that benefit in addition to everybody needs help.

I read years ago that the 4 most powerful words in English are "I need your help." or switch that around, "Can you help me?" another 4 words. People like to help. Keep that in mind. This is asking directly for help. It's nothing to be ashamed of. People like to be needed. People like to help, I certainly do. If you say, "Look, Tim, I don't know much about this topic. I know you lived in Japan. Look, I'm trying to learn a little bit about this." I would be happy to spend a couple of hours talking to you about that. There's nothing more I would love to do than help you learn about a place in Japan that I have been or have lived.

Joshua:
People like to be needed.

Tim:
Yeah.

Joshua:
I'm reading through How to Win Friends and Influence People.

Tim:
[inaudible 00:20:27].

Joshua:
Yeah. That book, however you say it. It is totally this resounding thing, and it keeps coming back to this idea of people like to be needed. People like to feel important. You said something interesting, and that was communicating the big picture. I think that's the number 1 hitch I have when I go and ask Hannah of like, "Hey, I really need help on this." This weekend I shot a video for a friend, and I'm like, "Man, I had to ask for help." which is ultimately she felt a part of the whole scenario. She felt like she added something to that chute, and it ended up making her feel really happy that she was there, but communicating what was in here and trying to get that out was really difficult. How would you help me in this situation, ultimately, help the audience in this situation?

Tim:
Well, I think you said. You took the time to communicate the big picture, and you got the help. I think it usually comes down to we, or let's say I, think that, "Oh, that's just too much information. There's too much background." You ask for help, or you give an order, or you make a statement without giving that big picture. Again, coming back to this thing. People like to help, but they also like to know the background of things. Treating each other humanly, treating each other like human beings and not machines. A machine, you punch in a domain and a website pops up, or you push a button, then you order something. It’s transactional. Whereas, humans, it's relational, it's not transactional.

By taking the time to explain the big picture, and why you need help, and how I can help you, and how they're involvement can help you and help them too, making them feel a part of it, as you said, I think keeping these in mind, you'll take a few extra minutes and explain the big picture. Their motivation would be higher as a result.

Joshua:
That's my biggest argument with Hannah consistently. She's like, "Tell me how you got there? Why is it that you want to go do this?" I'm like "No. I just want to go do it. I don't want to have to explain it." It's relational. It's about the relationship. It's about that connection. It's about the, "Here's why I'm doing that." That ultimately gives them ... It makes them feel needed. It makes them feel like they're a part of the situation. Man, that's such a good takeaway.

Tim:
Definitely. As you said, it makes them feel part. I'd say there are times where you can say, "Trust me, just do it." or "Trust me, let me do it." To do that, to have that kind of relationship that can be relational and transactional, you need a lot of trust where, "Trust me. I don't have time or energy to explain it right now. Let me just do this." You said communication and building that trust is key, but then there are times where you want to be able to be transactional, but you need trust for that.

Joshua:
That's good. Building trust, so it can be transactional. That's really good.

Tim:
Not all the time, but sometimes yes.

Joshua:
Yeah. Truth held intention, I like it. The last point you had made in the blog was thinking before accepting. Can you expand on that whole idea?

Tim:
Yeah. Well, I think it's a natural impulse to say yes to things, but I think we need to ask ourselves some critical questions before we say yes to something. I think we're taught to say yes, and yes we can, and yes I can help, or whatever. Asking yourself a few questions like, "Do I really have the capacity for this? Is this something I would be best doing, or could somebody else help out in this situation?" Asking yourselves these questions before accepting. What you don't want to do is you don't want to accept something. Let's say in a professional environment, you don't want to accept something even as ... With one of your clients, you don't want to accept something and come back later and say, "I couldn't manage it, or I need more time, or I need more resources." That's a bad reflection on you.

Joshua:
Man, I was just thinking of being out this weekend, doing this video for a friend. I've been stressed about when I'm going to be able to develop this content and actually go through and edit this content. I think that your point before about it's relational not transaction, it totally applies to this last point where it's think before accepting. Actually, for me, when somebody ask something of me, I don't typically go to the relational side of things and wanting to understand. I just do what I'm told.

Ultimately, I don't feel I get to be a part of that transaction. In a sense, I don't get to understand fully. Then when I've chosen to go more towards the relational side, I do feel like I'm a part of it, and I do feel like I can think before accepting. When I ask questions about, even in a paid situations, "Why am I getting paid and not this? Why am I doing this for free? Is this really going to benefit me or my businesses? What am I getting from the end of it?" The goal is to have a win-win, but just accepting things doesn't always produce that.

There's so much gold in this, man. I'm going to have to go back and listen to this again, because I'm going to have to dig through that. What would be your parting words for our audience as solopreneurs or entrepreneurs?

Tim:
Well, I think I would touch on this idea of being aware of why. You said why is the critical question. I have these 4 steps to take the strategic approach. You mentioned a couple of them. You think about the big picture and communicate the big picture and think before saying yes. I would add one final point to this list. That is recognize business as a choice. We all have moments in our life where the professional or the personal commitments are a lot. We've got people getting married, maybe I'm getting married, maybe somebody in family is sick, work is crazy. We all go through these periods where we're super busy.

However, we chose how busy we are. We chose what we spend our time on. We talked about you on Monday nights, for example. Be aware of the costs if there is a cost, or me working all weekend and not going out and listening to the birds and getting fresh air and sunshine. I'm choosing to stay at my computer all weekend. What's the cost? Be aware of why I'm doing what I'm doing and the costs of it. I think just increased awareness.

Joshua:
I think my brain typically will go to what is the cost on a monetary scale, but there's a relational scale too. I really like that you put that to like, "Hey, am I becoming more alive? If I'm not hearing the birds, will be alive on Monday? I'm going to actually function to the best of my abilities?" I think that's really good.

Tim:
That's right. I think this is something that I have to tell myself and learn and re-learn. I'm a solopreneur. I'm on my own. I'm doing things. You said we want to be productive. We want to make the most of our time. I think, "Okay. If I spend these 8 hours doing this ..." Well, the truth is one of the biggest parts of my job is thinking creatively and coming up with ideas and connecting the dots. I need stimulation for that. If I'm sitting in a dark room in my pajamas and computer, I don't get the stimulation coming in.

If I do something different, step away from the computer, do something different, this start generating some ideas and some creative thoughts and things. It's not just about ... For me, I could be probably more productive in 2 hours than I can in 8 hours if I've had some stimulation before. That's my biggest challenge, let's say.

Joshua:
Man, that's so good. Well, thank you so much for all of the knowledge you've poured into us. I know that I feel encouraged. Empire, we'll post the link. Just check out the blog. I think there's a ton of value just in this, and so many of his other posts. Yeah. Go check that out, guys. We'll have the links posted below. Thank you for tuning in. Tim, thank you so much for speaking to us.

Tim:
Thank you, guys.

Joshua:
Thank you so much for tuning in. I appreciate you guys listening, and I hope you were motivated by our guest today. Again, our podcast sponsor for the day was the Yorba Label Company. If you want to get that 25% off of 3,000 address labels, I know I already got mine, and I'm so excited about them, they're fantastic, go on to Amazon.com, search "address labels". You're going to find them under "Perfect Peel Address Labels. Click on it. In the check out, go to the promo section or the promo code, and type in "labels25". Again, that's going to secure you that 25% off.

Thank you so much for tuning in. I appreciate it guys. If you want to know more about us and everything we're doing, go on to the OnlineEmpireAcademy.com. You can also go on Facebook at Facebook/TheOnlineEmpireAcademy, or on YouTube, same thing, guys. I appreciate you tuning in. Until next time, empire. Have a fantastic day.

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