Proven Amazon Course

Amazon Product Ranking and Amazon Keywords Data Analysis

 

 

Transcript below:

Josh:
Alrighty, what’s up guys? We’re all here. Super, super excited to be with you. We’re going let people shuffle in just for another minute. Super, super fun. This is going to be a good day. Happy holidays, Merry Christmas to everybody. This is going to be a fantastic webinar and master class rather. Going to get that in the brain.

Dean:
Let’s see who we have real quick.

Josh:
Got double Mikes, what’s up double Mikes? Mike and Mike. Allie, got Allie, Keith, Linda [crosstalk 00:00:34]. I love it, Veronica, Ryan, Matthew, David. Guys, that’s so good. I’m so glad you’re here. Seems like people are starting to pile in. A ton of people here today, so I am very excited and very excited to pick a brain of the master.

Dean:
Sweet. I don’t know if you know that we have James Harbal. Just so you know guys, we had some things come up, we had to change some things up, but we have James Harbal which he outside of actually the people who create the Amazon algorithms, he is probably the only other person I know that understands Amazon like no other. If you want to know how Amazon data works, what’s important data, what’s not, this guy, he is the super genius like Wiley Cayote.

Josh:
I love it.

Dean:
How’s it going Norman, Stuart? Oh, Stuart is in Orange County man.

Josh:
What up Stuart?

Dean:
I’m in Buena Park down here and Josh is over in far-off place called Corona.

Josh:
Corona.

Dean:
[crosstalk 00:02:02] from Minnesota.

Josh:
I’ve heard Minnesota is pretty hot right now. It’s actually hotter in Minnesota than it is Reading from, so crazy day.

James:
It’s been warm, that’s for sure.

Josh:
It’s crazy.

James:
Relatively speaking, I guess.

Josh:
Yeah. So good. Well, you guys if you have not … We're going to get started first off. Thank you so much for being here all those who have not been to master class, you’re in for a treat. Our number one goal for the master classes is that you absolutely suck all the knowledge that you can out of the master. Today, we have on James Harbal. I’m so excited to have you man. Thank you for being willing to come on.

James:
[crosstalk 00:02:47].

Josh:
Absolutely. For those of you who are in right now, I need you to do one thing and one thing only, well actually two things. Number one, I need you to have a notepad and pen out because we are about to take some notes. I know I have mine ready and the information you guys are getting get today will absolutely blow your mind, so get ready for that. Second, if you have questions, do them as soon as you have the questions, just pop them up there. We’re going to be making sure that everybody gets their question answered, everybody that we can in the time that we have, get them answered because this is really about you guys.

I’m going to try to do my best to ask every question I possibly can that comes in my mind but this is where I need your guys’ help because that’s really where you’re going to get the most value out of this. You have free reign in the chat to ask as many questions as you want. This is what we want and what we want from you.

Again, like Dean said, James is the master at Amazon data, and he knows just as much, if not more, than anyone I have ever met. He knows more than anyone that I have ever met about Amazon data. I wanted to ask this question and I asked some questions about just kind of the world of Amazon and how the heck and why the heck we should be selling private label or more of that range of products because it really is an area that we should be getting into in 2016.

It doesn’t matter if you’re just starting out or if you’re already doing this private label thing, this is where we want to point our direction in in 2016 because this is how you can control your product to the best of your ability. I mean, we’ve talked all about this. We've talked about Amazon getting shut down. We personally know people have gotten shut down, and it has been a huge deal. We want make sure to drive in the point that this is where we’re going to thrive 2016, this is where we’re directed and we want you to be directed in this area, so hope you guys are excited as I am and Jean from Alpharetta Georgia, that’s where I grew up so thank you so much for supporting the local town.

Dean:
Just so you know guys, private label, unique products, wholesale, those are really our strategy for 2016. Just let you know, our team has done over $1.5 million just off of those types of products, unique products, wholesale, private label, things like that. In fact, one of our products alone just by itself on cyber Monday did $150,000 in revenue. We used to actually have Brett and all our team, we used to actually have a team that just did retail arbitrage and so on that went out and did that. The margins, they were not there and they are so fluctuating that it became really, really hard to sustain a team around it. That’s why we want to focus so heavily on in 2016 on these unique products. It doesn’t have to necessarily just be private label products but products that it's going to be hard for your competition to get into and really the only way to understand that and to do that is to understand how Amazon works and how Amazon data works.

There’s so many tools out there, so many other things out there that give you tons of data but we don’t understand the why behind the data, it becomes really hard to that’s why we brought James Harbal. Before we get into it, would you do me a favor, I’m going to pop up a poll really quick. Oh actually-

James:
I put up one.

Dean:
Oh you did, you punk. Let me see if I have my poll. The poll that James put up, you sneaky little Wiley Coyote said, “Do you sell on Amazon?” Some people said no. Okay cool. Private label, about 15% do private label, 15% do wholesale. The rest do retail arbitrage. People who are doing private label and wholesale, you guys are going to get a lot out of this from what you’re already doing and the people are doing retail arbitrage, this is going to help you to bridge that gap. The people if you’re doing private label right now or wholesale or have a unique product …

Josh:
Uh-oh looks like we lost him.

Dean:
That is now on the chat, you like that rather than retail arbitrage? Or would you prefer to go back to doing reselling and things like that?

Josh:
Okay, there we go. We lost you for a second, but it seems like your point was made clear. I actually got the numbers this morning from our private label products. Two of our private label products have done $1 million in the last 15 days, so this is with our teams and it’s down to our rank is 600 in one of the categories in 41,000 units moved over the past, I think it was either a month or 15 days, I’m not sure.

I actually think it might’ve been longer than that. Super, super exciting guys like private label, we’re super excited about we’re already doing it and like Dean said, we had teams doing retail arbitrage but there’s only so much you can do with that and we really are pushing towards that. Before we hop into it because James, I got questions up the Wazoo for you man. I am so excited about this, to learn more because like you guys, I’m learning and that’s the advantage that I have is I’m still learning this process and learning how to do it.

We talked to James and for your Christmas present for all who have attended, we have an amazing Christmas present for you guys. You can enjoy a free Christmas gift, a Keyword Inspector for the next seven days, it’s Keyword Inspector and KIPRT. If you have not gone and looked at those, absolutely incredible, absolutely wonderful, wonderful, wonderful apps and will change the game forever in how you do this. If you guys want that, the link is up there, totally free. It’s free for seven days I should say. For seven days, you guys gets unlimited searches. Correct?

Dean:
Yeah. Just so you know, no it’s not unlimited searches, but there is a free trial to be able to …

James:
But KIPRT, you can do unlimited like if you’re searching for a product like you can do unlimited searches, but not the keyword tool, we'll go through that.

Dean:
Yeah, and it’s not a big deal. The big thing is that I don’t think, I don’t know of any other place, any other deal where you can get keyword inspector for that free trial, that way, you kind of had to pry that out of your hands.

James:
Yeah, I like to keep it close to the chest.

Dean:
Your cold, dead hands Wiley Coyote. So yeah guys, enjoy that. If you get it, you can very quickly cancel whatever and just try it out, it’s really cool. We’re going to talk about some data stuff which we'll pertain to this to actually make it a lot more useful after this webinar. James, we’re going to be hammering you with some data questions okay. Go ahead Josh if you want to take it.

Josh:
Totally. Obviously, Amazon, a lot of is Amazon is data focused, it’s where we’re getting information from. Why do we need to and it’s a loaded question because we have a lot more based on this, but why the heck do we need to know the data on Amazon?

James:
Well, it’s a search engine. That’s what Amazon is and in order to be found on that search engine, you need to kind of know how it works. To know how it works, you need a lot of data due to proprietary, everything is proprietary on their side so you have to kind of can figure it out mainly through algorithms and stuff. You don’t have to have algorithms and stuff. You can figure out a lot of it out on your own but it’s a huge beast and lots of moving parts and you just got to kind of dive into it I guess.

Josh:
Okay. For the people who just kind of throw products out there, they're like, oh yeah, that barcode works great and they just throw products up there. What are they missing out? Why is it important to look at the data on let’s say there’s three different titanic DVD sets and they just throw it on the one that’s making the most money. Why is it important to look at the different sets to understand which one is the best or the real listing?

James:
You need to be on the real listing because Amazon tries to keep one product to one listing. They don’t like to have multiples for the same exact product. People get away with it for a while, but then, it gets taken down, merged and all that. You definitely need to do your due diligence when you’re in retail … I did retail arbitrage for a while. They definitely have to … We have to kind of figure out which ones, the real listing … In order to do that, there’s a few things you can look at like number of use, how many sellers are on there, you can look up price history like on camelcamelcamel real quick to see how that’s all working.

Usually, when you just scan a barcode, it’ll bring up the right product. For the most part here, it’s pretty simple to do but I’m sure a lot of you retail arbitrageurs know that. If you’re throwing up a private label or a product like that, you don’t have to worry about that I guess but you need to know if that product is going to sell, so that’s where you really need to dig in the data.

Josh:
That’s kind of the perfect question then, is you said kind of the difference between retail arbitrage and then going into private label, why is there importance between products that are private label and then arbitrage? Why should we view, in your opinion, why should we do a private label rather than arbitrage because arbitrage I can go get it at Walmart right now but sometimes private label, I’ve got to wait.

James:
Yeah, they definitely need more patience with private label stuff, but in the long run, it’s going to make you more money. That’s kind of the goal usually, retail arbitrage is a lot more work. I know I did it for a while there like I said. It just was a lot of work at home labeling, and boxing, and shipping, and stuff. Private label, I basically haven’t touched any of my products that are on Amazon for almost a year now. I haven’t had to like touch any of it just using other people to do my dirty work and I'm just sitting back and basically I’ve been so bored that I had to create this keyword inspector tool to kind of keep myself busy.

Josh:
How are you doing, how are you finding products like okay you’re using retail arbitrage, how are you optimizing your listings or obviously we talked a little bit about finding the best listing and finding the correct listings what are the ways that you are focusing your attention if you are at retail arbitrage, how are you without … I got to focus on this question because it’s without things like camelcamelcamel, without any other things, how are you figuring out that a product is ranking well, that a product is going to sell well throughout the year. How are you figuring it out without any apps?

James:
I used the apps, I guess. If you’re not using them, you should be, but the way I do things that I guess is probably different from a lot of people is I try to find those niches that are really are being underserved on Amazon. Usually, I know them just because I’m kind of in the niche, I kind of track it just because it’s like a hobby for me type of niche so I try to stick to those types where I know I’m kind of nerd/geek so [inaudible 00:16:11] types of products and done well in them but that’s one thing you need to kind of know the niche.

Don’t just get into something. You can just get into something or make money with it if you define that goal the nugget but [inaudible 00:16:27] if you’re not good at marketing or something, then you probably do want to do that, get a niche you know so you have that one up on marketing twice, you know the demographics but as far as finding a product so I like to look … What I used to do is we look at online sites that I track by Stephan like thinkgeek.com. I go on there. I get emails from them. That’s an example where I sent out an email about a new product they have and you can just go on their page.

It has Facebook likes on it that has a couple thousand already, then you know it’s a good product. You can source something like that. That’s what I used to do. I don’t do that really anymore because ThinkGeek is kind of against the whole retail arbitrage thing but I follow Kickstarter.

You can find accessories for Kickstarter products. That’s kind of how one of my private label products came into like just, it was a Kickstarter product and I found a good accessory for it that they were selling too but it was more expenses so I just kind of undercut them a little bit. They weren’t on Amazon at all so I got up on Amazon and sold most of it this Christmas so I’m doing well on that, but as far as other tools stuff I’ve been kind of building my own tools to make those listings the way they're supposed to be and those product niches that are kind of underserved I guess not as high competition.

Josh:
I like what you’re saying just about using different sites to your advantage. I don’t know that I thought about I mean, I’ll search things on Amazon obviously you can see which ones are top ranked. If you guys don’t know that, you can search what items are hot right now. It’s an easy search but I love that you use different websites almost against themselves.

They’re promoting this new product, I can go grab that and sell it. I mean it’s the online arbitrage way but it kind of takes to that step further and then you’re digging in a little bit deeper and saying oh it’s almost looking on different channels of like oh it’s on this website but it’s getting 1000 likes on Facebook. I know it’s going to be hot. I think that that’s a fantastic way to do that and a fantastic way to look into it. This kind of leads into the next question is why are customers buying certain products and not others.

James:
Visibility, I guess could be the major thing you need to worry about is can you be found on Amazon or if you have your own e-commerce site, can you be found on Google type of thing, that’s the big what if I guess or can you get found on Amazon if you put up your own product or probably listing or if it’s just retail product, arbitrage product. That’s the big ideas to try to be found in Amazon.

Josh:
Totally. What about like I mean you’ve researched, you have thousands and thousands and thousands of gigabytes and a bunch of terabytes of information based on why people or what they’re buying and your backlogs of it. What are you finding in all of this information of like why are people attracted to certain products and not other products?

James:
I don’t know, I guess I really analyzed it in that specific way as far as I mean, I have the data to do it but I can’t, I haven’t really gotten into it that deep yet. I got a lot of stuff I could still do with all the data I have but I’m just trying to figure it all out.

Dean:
I think there’s a better way of asking it is look, I can go to … This is what I hear all the time when people are trying to do unique products or private label products, I can just go to the bestseller list, this one has great reviews, I can go to Amazon find the bestseller, amazing sales rank, sales rank is great, therefore, it’s going to be a good product right.

James:
Everyone does that.

Dean:
Why doesn’t that work?

James:
Because everyone is doing it and so the market gets flooded right away, that’s the easy pickings. You can make some money through it quick if you can get into it fast enough but I’m trying to bring that kind of data to light here pretty quick, but yeah, if you can get into it real quick, you’re going to be on top of things, you kind of get it on there as fast as possible, do what you got to do like I had a product where I saw it on Dr. Oz. I’m like I got to get that on Amazon because it was really underserved.

I just got it shipped to my house and I packaged it, labeled it. I brought a printer to print out labels. It's sitting on my desk here, not doing anything anymore because I have it all outsourced now from Canada the main product, got the jars and packed it myself, got it sent to Amazon because I did MF, I merchant fulfilled for a while there just because I wanted to get it signed right away.

It did sell it right away but after a while, you got into FBA. After a while, it sold really good really well. I made some money out of it, I’m still making a little bit of money but just people starting to see that and flooded in just like all the products so you got to kind of be on top of the curve in order to get that rank. It’s all about being number one on Amazon as far as your keywords, knowing which keywords to be on. The sooner you get in there, the better your rank stick I guess is the way to put it.

Dean:
Let’s kind of start before we talk into the tool that you developed and the things that you created. We use like literally, someone’s dying back there, it’s one of my kids, sorry. You actually created tools that our business absolutely depend on. We would not be making the money we make right now without your tools at all. You flew out, you’ve talked to Brett. You've seen our operation and everything like that and it’s completely dependent on you James, that’s why I love you, you need anything, just let me know.

James:
I got to take a couple months’ vacation … Can I …

leveragerandom

Dean:
Hop on down here anytime. Let’s kind of go into the different data points so I want to talk about … that’s on rank, I want to talk about reviews, I want to talk about promotions, I want to talk about any type of estimated sales, estimated volume, things like that. Starting with sales rank, how is that important building like a portfolio of products or building a product. Is it something that you need to worry about like right now as you’re trying to build a private label product or a unique product?

James:
As far as having a certain sales rank

Dean:
Not your product, not your own-

James:
Yeah. It depends on the category of course. Different categories have different sales volumes for certain specific DSR sales rank. It’s important just so … When you’re looking at Amazon, you’re just seeing that one hour’s data point basically. Every time you look, it’s just how many things have been sold over the past approximately over the past day for the most part and maybe a little bit of the week. That’s all kind of in their equation to create that VSR. It’s important so you kind of have an idea as to how many are selling to kind of add them all up. All the products are the same and see that there’s kind room in there for you.

Dean:
If I were looking at say a product, I’m doing my research and I see a product that sales rank is like just through the roof and I go and say it's 500 in toys or something like that. I’m like, “Hey I want to private label that product or create a unique bundle or something like that with that product because it’s that day, it doesn’t necessarily, it’s not an indicator that it’s always been 500. It doesn't mean that's a bestseller overtime. It could be that they ran a promotion or something like that where they just sold a bunch of them at like two dollars a piece or something like that.

James:
You have to be mindful of that. You have to do it manually. You have to pretty much watch it over time to see how it goes up and down, ebbs and flows to kind of get a gauge on the average of the sales rank just so you know it’s not like a fluke.

Dean:
How about what about … When you’re looking at like a bestseller, I mean really it’s just an indicator as kind of that snapshot in time. When you have your product, your goal shouldn’t be to necessarily get a lower sales rank immediately. It’s not going to do anything via promotions or anything like that for you in general, but your goals should be again as consistently low sales rank like what’s the importance for I guess your own product or your own unique bundle. Is there any importance? Does it even matter? In my mind, it doesn’t seem like it’s that important.

James:
Yeah, sales rank is like it doesn’t cause your products to be found. It’s just I guess the symptom of it so the more you sell, the better your sales rank. Sales rank doesn't really have an effect on your keyword. The sales rank is just indicator of how well you’re doing. You can’t really think of it any more than that I guess.

Dean:
Okay, okay cool so how about reviews? I'm creating my private label product. If I get 100 five-star reviews whether I promoted them are not with a coupon or whatever, I’m going to sell a ton from then on.

James:
Reviews these days, that kind of used to be a couple years ago, but nowadays reviews, they're not as important. You still need a few at least to kind of get started to kind of have that social proof. I guess it depends on the niche. If you’re going to try it again, the niche with most products having thousands of reviews, you’re probably going to need hundred tens of thousands of dollars, hundreds of thousand dollars to get into it to actually beat out those guys or even just carve out a little bit of piece of pie for yourself.

I think Amazon is probably looking at it more and more as trying to weed out the ones that are trying to gain that review system. They’re not taking into account as much anymore. It’s not as important. If you get a few, that’s good. Try to keep getting them through emails is really important just to kind of keep adding more and more per day.

Dean:
It’s more of like a social proof conversion type thing especially [inaudible 00:29:29] or the answer something like that.

James:
Reviews are good for keywords if you can get, try to manipulate the people that buy your products with the emails, try to get them to put in keywords into their reviews. Supposedly I don’t have any hard data on that but I got so much data, I don’t have review data right now but someday, I’ll start … But supposedly, reviews are an indicator to Amazon’s algorithm that your product is relevant to what our keywords are in that review.

Dean:
That’s interesting. It kind of reminds me of how Google, the old search engines used to just look at the keywords on page and then Google was pretty much the first one to look at the off page keywords linking to your site as relevancy so the reviews are kind of independent people using those keywords. It says, “Hey I’ll put more of a weight on it.”

James:
It might be the things that I've seen from people saying that reviews count for keywords might be like an after effect of having those reviews with the keywords. I mean, what I’m saying is like you said Google, they scrape Amazon, your product with those reviews on it then they rank you on their search engine and then if somebody clicks through Amazon from Google, you might get keyword thing because Google thinks it’s relevant so then Amazon probably gets the keyword via that link click.

Dean:
Yet it’s actually interesting. I never even thought that because they can see generally, they’ll be able to see what keyword was used to come to that page. That’s pretty cool.

James:
[crosstalk 00:31:29] after …

Dean:
You guys you heard this first, this is something that I’ve actually never heard before, it makes sense. This is the beauty of these master classes also you’re sitting with someone who is a master in this field. That was actually pretty …

James:
I can’t sleep sometimes, I’m thinking so much.

Dean:
I can’t think sometimes, I’m sleeping so much. Cool, so what about promotions. A lot of people are like, “Hey, we need to run promotions.” We’re going to make it. It’s good to be awesome because will get 1000 people buying and then or rank number one.

James:
Well, Amazon has kind of put the kibosh on that too these days as far as giving away dollar products, their algorithm takes that out of the equation these days as far as like discounted products. I haven’t really done a lot of promotions lately, I’ve been kind of focusing on my tools and stuff so I’m not really up on the latest and greatest. It seems that promotion aren’t as … Discounts and stuff aren’t as a big of a deal as far as trying to rank and stuff but if you can get a ton of traffic with a full price sale somehow via Google Adword or Facebook ads or whatever and try to speed space out those sales for over a week or so, try to build up the sales over that timeframe that the Amazon really likes what they see, with that kind of thing.

Josh:
Something that I’ve kind of wondered myself is a I see ads on Facebook all the time for certain products and stuff. As a seller, is it important to do those kinds of things? Do Google ads or Facebook ads, do you really think it shifts things that much for you?

James:
Yeah, some of the gurus … If you’re into that kind of stuff, if you’re comfortable with it then go right ahead because it definitely will help with your ranking on Amazon, your organic ranking, so yeah go ahead but if you’re not comfortable with that kind of stuff, I’m not very comfortable with that kind of stuff so I don’t really do … I tried to find those products that will do well on Amazon without requiring all that but then it’s more of a long-term play far as getting ranked on Amazon stuff so you had to kind of play by ear as far as what you need to do. It usually depends on the niche. If you’re getting into a highly competitive niche, you’re going to probably need those Amazon ads and stuff to help with your rank.

Dean:
Cool, that’s great. Let’s kind of get into more of the stuff that actually you start kind of needing tools for I mean there are tons of tools out there to find stuff like this. One, how important and how accurate are some of like the estimated search volume. There are tons of tools out there. How do I know via say a listing or a type of product or a particular keyword. Guys, go ahead and keep on asking your questions. Just because we haven’t answered them doesn’t mean we’re not going to.

We’re going to answer them soon. Danny had a really good question as far as finding keywords of your competitors, but how can you start finding … Is this a good market? I know there’s Google keyword planner if you can talk to that and how that relates to Amazon. And then there’s any really kind of a more accurate way of finding keywords and things like that on Amazon for products?

James:
Yeah, there’s lots of tools. Most of them rely on Amazon suggest tool. They also rely on your knowledge. You have to basically seed the keyword or find … It never made sense to me how people find keywords for products. That’s why I built a tool for, but how people do it or how most people do it just because it’s easy and it makes sense to them I guess is that they divine the keyword that they thing is most relevant to that product and most [inaudible 00:36:21] out there with different mentalities, different backgrounds.

They all searched different ways. You’re just 1% of that, those people. Beyond that, you use that keyword that you think you know is right for the product and you search for it so you’re going to find all of these other keywords that have the exact same keyword in there and you’re going to go on from there. You can go to Google keyword planner and find out how people search on Google to find that type of product, but again, Google is a whole different type of search engine. It’s a research engine. It’s not like a to buy engine type of thing where people are typing in buyer keywords like instead of saying what is this, they’re just going to put it … You guys know what that means.

All them tools basically rely on that divine keyword that you kind of popped in your head I guess from whatever you know about the product and you go on your merry way manually, manually finding all these keywords that may or may not work. The volumes that basically is one tool, there used to be one tool. You guys will find out a little bit more about that earlier but the one tool gives you the supposed volume, estimated volumes for Amazon searches. It says I don’t know, it’s merchant word, it says right on their site how they estimate all but it’s kind of like voodoo basically all they do, they grab … Let me kind of look at this again, how we get this data.

They visit pages on Amazon just like Google does and they grab terms from there and they pull the search volume from Google which is inaccurate because people search differently on Google than they do Amazon and with their little algorithm, they kind of put like, they divine basically, they divine the volume. You look on there and a lot of useless [inaudible 00:39:01] have told me they’ve tried to rely on merchant words type of volumes. They kind of lost a lot of money doing that so hope that don't lose you that money too, but yeah, it’s really inaccurate.

They seem to grab keywords from … Beyond that tool so all the tools like they are nice, they give you a list of what you think could be good but they don’t really dive in deep into what is actually, what kind of keywords are actually being used to find those products. They just kind of because they are not based on the products they're based on your divine knowledge of it. I should stop using the word divine.

Josh:
I have a question, I have a question just around that.

James:
I’m kind of running on here, so yeah, go ahead.

Josh:
You’re so good. One of the biggest questions that I have and it goes along with that is how do I find if I’m not using a specific product like keyword inspector, how do I find what keywords are going to work and what aren’t. Genuinely, this is my biggest struggle and it’s something me and Dean have talked about 100 times is focusing on keywords and focusing it on the keywords that are going to work. I go brain-dead as soon as that subject comes up because for those of you who aren’t using something like keyword inspector and in any other app that’s out there, what’s the best way that you know of to do that?

James:
I don’t know. You kind of got me on the loss. That’s why I built a tool is because that’s the best way and as far as I can imagine out of find products is keywords for product is to actually run all the 40 million+ keyword searches and find actual products and reverse … that any other good way of doing it, that would actually net you some real hard, factual data that kind of says that this product is being found via this keyword search type of thing. I have used other tools like SpyFu. It’s kind of a roundabout way of doing it, but I had to basically ingest all the data that could get me from via Amazon, search via Amazon, Earls and kind of backtrack that. That’s, again, you can’t really do that on your own type of thing but you can … I don’t know. I mean, I can’t really do it without my tool, I guess.

Josh:
Totally. It’s good to know because I feel like I’m going crazy so many times trying to figure out if I private label a Frisbee, my keyword is going to be Frisbee. It just makes sense but there may be other things that are going to be way better for Frisbee.

James:
Like I said, there’s 1 million different people and they all search differently. There’s all these broad strokes people where they may be 50% of people search one way and 25% search another but we’ve got all these different people from different backgrounds, different languages. You’re not going to know all this stuff. You can’t figure out how somebody is going to … How somebody that only speaks Spanish how they search on Amazon. I know they’re not always do a lot of search on Amazon but when they do, maybe you can maybe know that niche a little bit but you don’t know the exact words people would use to find something. There’s always these … Everybody else is using the merchant work and stuff, they’re using these divine keywords and basically they're always in the exact same keywords to kind of optimize your listing for but when you do that, you’re all hopping on the same keyword and you're not going to get anywhere that way.

You want to try to diversify your keywords and try to find those that people aren’t finding, your competition are finding and optimize for those to grab all that traffic that nobody else is using. That’s what kind of the tool is about I guess.

Josh:
Totally. That was my next question was okay I’m hopping on for the first time. I’ve been on keyword inspector so I understand it a bit but how does a keyword inspector help me develop the best keyword possible. Let’s use Frisbee for example, how would keyword inspector … Do I just type in keyword inspector, do I type in Frisbee and then it comes up with great keywords that go along with that?

James:
Trying to divine the keywords again with the Frisbee. I’m kind of working on a tool that might help you out that way but right now, it doesn’t work that way. Basically what you’re doing is fine, those products are selling well Frisbees that are on Amazon and you use the product and you kind of reverse the search and with the data that I have on the tool, you find all the keywords that people are using to find a product. Then you know exactly what people are using to search for the product because what we do, what I do, we grab keywords only from Amazon suggest thing and from the related searches that they give you. We grab only those keywords.

We don’t try to divine them from every product listing. You can’t really do it that way because that’s not how it works, I guess, so we just reverse that end give you all the keywords. What I used to do up until today was I had this big algorithm that looked at reviews and categories, PSR’s and a little bit of Google volume thrown in there and this algorithm would sort it, I would tell people basically it’s sorted from like most converting to least converting keyword type of thing.

I already love that but I’ve been working on processing like 2 billion rows of data that haven’t been using yet or the past month and half or so, I finally kind of put together a way to kind of get a better, not like a better but a way to actually put a number to the rank that would make more sense to people. In that way, you can actually be able to tell what’s currently the best keyword to use for a product. You still have to kind of take them. What a lot of people do is use PPC to kind of … Amazon PPC to kind of figure out the ones that are actually getting traffic, so yeah.

Josh:
That’s good. What about search volume? How do I understand, what is a good search volume for this? It's something that’s so new to me. Can you explain search volume and then explain how we can use it to the best of our ability.

James:
Most people know search volume as via like Google. A lot of Google data they give you is their ads impressions type of thing. It’s good for Google but it’s not for Amazon. It’s clearly different search engine. I keep telling people this so volume, it’s an indicator of keywords like of what people are using to search for products. You kind of look at the big picture, there’s kind of this one word keywords that people use to kind of just start their search and then they kind of go on this journey through … There’s probably 50% of people that do that where I just throw that number out there.

They just kind of go through this journey. They start at one small keyword and they kind of figure out, “Hey that looks like a good product. I always kind of search for that type of product with a longer keyword type of thing.” You got a kind of … I only have really a tool that will figure that out for you, not yet at least. You can kind of go from the big volume keywords to kind of go down your niche. Even if it has a low-volume, it might have a high conversion rate so you might want to go for that one instead of the one that everybody all the products in Amazon [inaudible 00:48:40] for, type of thing. You can’t really compete with that because if every product has the word ‘the’ in it, you can’t compete for the keyword ‘the’ , it’s just an example but obviously you’re not the go for ‘the’. I don’t think people would search for ‘the’.

Josh:
That’s a great example. What about KIPRT? I mean we recently did a webinar just about this but for those people who are just getting started with maybe private label or trying to figure out how to better rank their products, why should we use KIPRT?

James:
KIPRT is kind of, it kind of can get you into the niches that nobody else can find I guess. The ones that have the opportunity there so what it does is you can filter a whole … I’ve got basically Amazon products list in my database with all the data behind, the sales ranks like an estimated number of sales on it, reviews and all this data you can kind of sift through and find those products that might be underserved via filters I guess.

Then you can kind of look at history instead of getting that one hour of that snapshot that you would just by going on Amazon and looking at their bestseller list, you got all this data behind it on KIPRT where you can look at it like more in a year’s worth of sales estimates, but like reviews in pricing and stuff you can kind of see how that specific niche just kind of going, how it’s waning or … Going up and down but you kind of get that overall view and you can actually kind of instead of divining, I keep using that word but instead of divining how a product is doing, you can actually see the hard data behind it and actually make a decision, more educated decision based on that. That’s what KIPRT solved I guess.

Josh:
Yeah we have two questions about KIPRT. What does it stand for?

James:
It’s just short for keyword inspectors product research tool KIPRT.

Josh:
Perfect. Perfect, perfect. Okay and then my next question and one of the most important to the people who are listening is sourcing. I know there's reverse sourcing techniques. There's all these things. How are you personally finding private label products and pushing those?

James:
Recently, I’ve been trying to stick with USA stuff based. I kind of shy away from China not because I've lost my earning from them. I’ve got stuff from China, but I try and just go on Google and search private label dot, dot, dot, or even wholesale sometimes dot, dot, dot or keyword, keyword. Just search on Google and find it. What are the main ones that I use?

Josh:
I think the easier question would be how do you know okay so you’ve searched for broad … Before you start searching, you’re probably searching for a unique product or a unique niche that you know is going to sell, how do you know what niche is going to sell or how do you know what product to source that's going to sell.

James:
I don’t know, if you’re just starting out, just try to stick to something you know, otherwise, use KIPRT to kind of filter out, try to find those hidden gems where you’re not really being, there’s one or two people are signing a bunch load of products. They don’t have a lot of reviews, they have really high price. You can undercut them a little bit maybe or they have really bad reviews but they are still selling a lot type of thing or they’re selling not on Amazon and like I said with ThinkGeek, you can tell from that type of thing and just kind of find a bunch of products that you think will sell and then try to source them and try to get them at the right price.

If you can get like a few, just throw them up on Amazon and see what sells, try to get some real data based on actual sales that you made. I know that’s really jumping ahead but you just try to find something to sell and see if it sticks. You can throw a bunch of stuff up on there for cheap. You don’t have to buy a cargo load full of products to make it big. For most [inaudible 00:54:07] you don’t have to, I guess.

Josh:
When your private labeling a product, are you ordering multiple SKUs?

James:
Not right away. I mean, you’re going to start with one SKU. If you could start now you’re just going to throw one SKU, one SKU and one niche maybe throw a bunch of niches if you're kind of like me where you can’t focus on one thing. If you can focus on one thing then yeah, go wide or go deep, that’s kind of up to you that both ways work on Amazon, you just have to kind of know how to market it, I guess. There’s benefits to go in deep as far as having all the same types of products or one that kind of play off each other.

There’s if you want to kind of play Amazon, you got to have kind different niches because sometimes one might get taken off Amazon for whatever reason so at least you have that other product to kind of keep going as long as you don’t get suspended or something it’s just the one product. [inaudible 00:55:28] play Amazon as far as their … You don’t want to do stuff that’s black hatch.

There’s always that little bit of a notion that somebody else could be kind of gunning for you and trying to take you off. I don’t mean to scare people. I mean it doesn’t really happen to me at all but there’s always that kind of diversify on Amazon. That’s kind of the way I do it, I guess.

Josh:
No, it’s good. It’s great advice. I know Dean talked about earlier that we’ve done bundles. Just finding one product on a specific website or whatever we can private label and then bundling it with another and ultimately, that gives us the head up. Then using a keyword inspector to blow that off the top of like using awesome keywords that are combining the two different awesome niches. There’s amazing ways you can do it and just some awesome, awesome, awesome tools with KIPRT and keyword inspector that can end up ranking those products. I mean we have one that’s 600 right now. It’s all thanks to using this specific app. I want make sure to hit as many questions as we can so if you’re ready James, we can hop straight into those.

James:
Yeah, see if I can go down the list here.

Josh:
The first one is will there be a replay? Yes, absolutely there will be. Do you offer a one-to-one mentorship?

James:
I don’t have time for that stuff, but I think we’re working on some kind of thing in the future here, not one to one necessarily but maybe like a mastermind group so that’s kind of in the works, I think. What this keyword search terms, there’s no way possible to get those back end keyword search terms from other listings.

Josh:
Let me read the question, that way people can know. What Danny’s question it says, is it possible to find out what five keyword search terms on Amazon listing that you do not own. I’m not sure totally the question, it sounds like you already understand it, Amazon told me that if it is not your listing, you cannot find out what those five terms are. Will you explain the question a little bit for those who don’t understand like me, sorry guys.

James:
When you’re creating a listing, you got the front end, basically there’s two areas, two major areas of where you put keywords. You got your title and your backend, one that nobody else can see that’s when you’re creating the listing, it’s the search terms. There’s like five fields where you can put whatever you want and nobody else can really see it but you. There’s no way to get that data at all. That just gives you an extra area. Some people say it’s mostly for being relevant to your PPC stuff but it does give relevancy just to any keyword search on Amazon too I believe but there’s the way of doing that. We got that.

Josh:
Raymond, he was answering someone’s question and that is RA is so time-consuming to manage hundreds of SKUs. I totally agree. Working with our teams, it’s when we had our teams going out and doing a bunch of RA. It really was hard to keep track of it and then on top of that, try to keep track in on top of all the different changing, the changing numbers and how much the listings were changing. It ended up being a headache

James:
It’s not scalable yeah.

Josh:
Exactly or [inaudible 00:59:54] BSR is a training indicator. Can you shed light to any of that?

James:
It says the trailing indicator so basically if you look at something right now it gives you like a 600 like you have, that’s kind of telling you that over the past day, it might’ve got 100 sales, over the past hour, it might have got 100 sales. Over the past day, it might’ve got 150 sales. In over the past week, it might have got in total maybe 175. It goes back a little like a window and tie in, the closer that window is to the current time, the more effect it has on the rank. That’s all my equations when I’m calculating sales averages on KIPRT but it kind of goes back in time and kind of follows along. You’re only seeing that little bit in time and mostly what you’re seeing is just the past few hours basically. That’s why you can’t really go off of that solely. You can’t really do that anymore these days. That’s why looking at the bestseller list is kind of a bad idea just because of that.

Josh:
Totally. Merchant words, can you explain that?

James:
Yeah, that’s like the go to keyword tool when you’re kind of divining a keyword. You can just type in a keyword, get supposedly all the keywords that really just have the phrase that you put in there in it. You have to kind of do your own manual searching with that tool and they give you a supposed estimated volume but most people have found it’s not very accurate. That’s can be the old way of doing things.

Josh:
Then Linda, yes, the original plan was to have Ace Inpsector, but we had just different things fell through and we wanted to bring as much value as possible. If you guys have further questions, please let us know but yeah, to that, I apologize again. Question for James, on keyword inspector, when searching a competitor, you get about 500 lines on Excel, how/where do you build these into your listing?

James:
Okay, so keyword inspector has different parts or report. One will just give you a bunch of keywords, no real ranking on them or anything. If you put your own product into there, you can figure out where your keywords are coming from, all your organic, all your traffic is coming from within Amazon but you can also use this other report that will rank it from like I said most converting to least converting.

What you want to do with that list is basically take the top keywords from that list, the one that sorted and you put that, try to get those top ones in your title, in your title and your search term fields, and the backend like we were talking about just a little bit ago. We want to use them, put them in their first and foremost so you got all these other keywords, what do you do with them? You can stick them in your bullet points, those supposedly help you rank for certain things.

I guess starting out usually you don’t really want to stuff everything full 2000 characters and description, 500 characters in each bowl of plate. You don’t want to do that. You want to kind of try and put a few keywords in there and see what happens basically and keep looking at the data as far as like Amazon gives you the session data and stuff kind of see how you’re being found and kind of work from there. It worked from the data you get from Amazon and add the keywords that are seem to be making you money if you can find that, take out the keywords that aren’t really doing anything for you because a little bit of technical on the search engine side. You have kind of not really focusing on one keyword so then Amazon doesn’t make you more relevant for one keyword versus another one.

You kind of want to focus in on a few keywords so that Amazon thinks you're really highly relevant for those keywords so you get ranked better for them starting out type of thing. That’s how most search engines work so the keywords are also good for your PPC. You can use them in your ad words if you want. I don’t really tested it for ad words side but I guess Pinterest people have had luck with using the keywords for Pinterest ads. Now that Pinterest is pretty much opened up everything for business stuff.

Yeah, they’re good for that too so you’re definitely then now we just launched our little volume indicator on the reports like sensitive reports that will give you really a better indicator as which keywords you should probably try to use. You’re probably not going to go for the ones that have a 2 million search volume. You’re going to want to go for the ones that make more sense for your product, longer tailed keywords I guess, the ones with more words in them usually. You want to use them again in your search title, make it relevant, highly relevant for those just a few keywords and go from there.

Josh:
That’s good. Forgive me if you’ve already hit portions of this, but on Amazon, is there anything close to the individual interest and previous purchase history or types of audience that we could be able to generate on Facebook. I think it’s more is there compiled data about specific and please correct me if I’m wrong Frederick, but is there compiled information about individual buyers?

James:
One thing with KIPRT, we have a kind of a reverse search on KIPRT where you do a search so with KIPRT, you could use keywords to find products, basically it searches all the product titles and brings up all those products that are relevant. What we can do is you take all them products that you find with that keyword search and what it’ll do is Amazon gives us the data that gives us the relevant products to all these products, so what I do is reverse it where it gives you all the top relevant products to one product.

From there, you can kind of figure out maybe you want to sell this and this alongside or bundle them together even. You can kind of do that reverse search in KIPRT and figure out maybe products that would kind of work well together because Amazon already deems them relevant or similar to each other. That’s about as far as the kind of data you can get, as far as Facebook, I don’t mess a lot with Facebook so there’s not really much you can do with data from Amazon, Facebook I guess, you kind of figure it out on your own.

Josh:
I think he was just talking about more of the touching on what Amazon or Facebook provides within the specific interest. What is the main way to be selected in the Amazon box so the buy box, what's the best way to rank for that?

James:
Basically. You’re probably talking more about retail arbitrage where you’re kind of competing against other sellers. I haven’t really done a lot with that for the past year or so, so I’m not real up on it. I kind of stay in the groups that talk about retail arbitrage like scan power and stuff. The best way is just try to don’t do the whole price war thing going down to the bottom of the barrel type of thing. Just try to stick to the same price or just a few cents above you, you’re going to get in the … I can't remember what they call it but you’re going to kind of be fed in every once in a while.

You have to be FPA, that gives you a boost on buy box, your sort of seller ratings that kind of gets you in the buy box more or less. You want to be up in that 100% to get the most bang for your buck as far as getting in the buy box. That’s about all you can do really is keep your price at the same. That’s about all I know I can tell you about that I guess.

Josh:
That’s good. James, are you scalping the Amazon data or are you using Amazon API to get to data?

James:
So yeah, Amazon doesn’t give out all the data that I do but they do have their API that I use and some other proprietary stuff that I use and I kind of put on to the big database and kind of figure all out and analyze it and give it to my users and easy to ingest, an easy way to look at it I guess. I can’t really go on the specifics about how I do it but there’s no connect between you the user of Keyword Inspector and Amazon. They can’t really, they don’t know who’s using Keyword Inspector. There’s no liability on your side, there’s not much on my side either, so it’s not really the big worry about that.

Josh:
Tony’s asking how are keywords supposed to be inserted into those fields with commas without commas, with dashes separated them etc., how do you tend to put them in?

James:
No commas, try to keep them in the phrases and keep them in a good order of phrase how you would say it and that’s probably all I can tell you about that. I don’t have any hard data on that, but that’s what most people kind of … Amazon confuses everybody because with their little example, they put the commas in there but I think those commas really are meant for just kind of separate the phrases that you want to put in there. You don’t actually want to put the commas in those fields. That’s kind of my thought on it.

Josh:
Okay. How can I build the 500 lines of Excel data from Keyword Inspector into my listing?

James:
We already kind of went over that and really nothing much to say about that I guess.

Josh:
Cool. What about misspelled words?

James:
That one, I don’t know. I haven’t really found a use for it. It’s kind of cool to know I guess. I kind of just put it on there because I have the data. I figured I just put it there. It’s hard to know what to do with that. You can throw it in your [PIP-C 01:12:36] and see what it does. I analyze that as far as what it’s good for. It’s just kind of nice to know that people are misspelling things and Amazon has seen that and actually given the data for that. I don’t know. It’s just there.

Josh:
I love it.

James:
I don’t know what Dean does with that or if anything or …

Josh:
Yeah, I’m not sure either. It’s a great question. If you guys have any more questions, we'll stay on for a few more minutes. Again you guys have a free 7-day KIPRT and Keyword Inspector deal. It’s up in the chat box if you look at the very top, it says welcome everyone, enjoy your free Christmas gift. This is our Christmas gift to you guys and thank you so much for being on. I so appreciate the knowledge you bring to the table. I mean I feel like my brain hurts with how much is there.

James:
My brain hurts nonstop.

Josh:
I love it. It looks like we’re not having any more questions come in. Any ending words of wisdom about using keyword inspector? Also well there is one, Stacy can you do a screen share? There is a screen share on how to use it on the keywordinspector.com, correct?

James:
Yeah.

Josh:
Okay, perfect, perfect, perfect.

James:
We’re trying to put up more … I’ve been a one-man show since last July, started keyword inspector and not the greatest at marketing stuff. It’s all been word-of-mouth and people really enjoy my tools so I haven’t really had the need to put a lot of education out on it but yeah we’re working on education definitely. We're kind of hard-core at that right now education wise and trying to get that out there so you guys can actually use what you’re getting.

As far as the tool it’s been really kind of steam rolling along as far as putting out new stuff and I've been really hard at work in the behind the scenes, trying to get together all the data I have and trying to kind of make it make sense to you the users so I’ve been working on that. It’s definitely coming to a fresh in here. It’s just a little bit of that, a little bit tip of the iceberg of that. Today we put out the keyword volume indicators data on the extensive report so it’ll help kind of help you kind of see the light through the fog type of thing because I know a lot of people are kind of more analytical and they want to see that kind of number so it’s there now. That’s just definitely the tip of the iceberg. It’s more common in the next month here. Watch for that. It’s going to be mind boggling probably to some.

Josh:
Awesome. Well thank you so much for being on and thank you for all that have listened. If this is again your first master class, thank you so much for being here on the master class. We so appreciate you for coming in and James for teaching us. If you guys want to know more about the Online Empire Academy, we are on YouTube but we have our page the onlineempireacademy.com. You can also find us on Facebook, super active group there guys. We are here for you and want to help you develop and build your business into an empire. Again James, thank you, thank you for everything.

James:
Thanks for having me.

Josh:
Absolutely. Until next time empire, have a fantastic day and we will see you on the next one.

James:
All right, take it easy

 

About The Author

Dean Soto

Founder of the Online Empire Academy and creator of Wooshmetrics.com

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